A "Hand Across," not a "Handout"

Welcome to "Mission Monday"! These posts will flesh out and explore various aspects of LAMP Seminary RDU's distinctive emphases and vision. This season of Thanksgiving, Advent, and Christmas gives us another opportunity to consider issues of poverty, injustice, and how to best use the resources God has given us. In the swirl of Black Friday (right after we stop and "give thanks" for all that we have, we scurry out to get more!), Cyber Monday, and now "Giving Tuesday," many voices clamor for our monetary allegiance. Pictures of starving children appear in our inbox, we fill shoe-boxes with school supplies and toys, and perhaps serve a Thanksgiving meal for the homeless. It seems that in our annual economic stampede to acquire more and give gifts to others, we also feel to pull bless those who have so little. This is a good and noble desire. God commands it, and promises to bless it (Proverbs 19:17-"Whoever is generous to the poor lends to the Lord, and he will repay him for his deed.") It reflects God's nature, as the God who gives his gifts with outlandish liberality and generosity.

But, whenever we give (whether it be our time or our money), we can unintentionally reinforce negative patterns of dependency, paternalism, or even our selfish pride. We've all heard the slogan that we want to give a "hand up," not a "hand out." I've used it myself, repeatedly. However, Soong Chan-Rah challenges this way of thinking and speaking.

Read the rest at Studium et Liturgica!